Mar. 29th, 2012

stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Loved the style, hated the politics. This, considering that I was rather afraid that I'd hate the first significant female author in modern English, is a better outcome than I'd expected. And really, one doesn't expect the seventeenth century to be hugely enlightened when it comes to race relations. (Nobody, including the black hero, batted an eyelid at the concept of slavery, for example.) Still, it wasn't exactly comfortable reading.

Aphra Behn tells a good yarn. I wasn't entirely sure how much she'd experienced and how much she was making up; her evocative descriptions and her colloquial style were very readable.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/10388552/
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Annie On My Mind for the nineties. Same author, and covering the same sort of themes - coming out at high school, experience of homophobia, vocation to the arts. The school is co-educational now, and the setting has moved from the city to the back of beyond, but there are definite echoes of Garden's earlier (and more famous?) work.

Which is not to say that this was not an enjoyable book in its own right. It contained many of my favourite tropes: coming out (to oneself, particularly), platonic female/male friendship, school... I particularly loved the theatrical theme (even if the parallels with The Crucible made me roll my eyes a bit). In places I found it too painful to read much at a time, but it's ultimately a moving, hopeful novel.

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