stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
More of the same: theatrical murder told largely from the point of view of Nigel Bathgate. Trollerific prologue notwithstanding, I didn't guess the murderer, though wasn't particularly surprised by the revelation. I was rather intrigued by the tension between Inspector Alleyn and Stephanie Vaughan; I don't think I've seen him particularly interested by anyone other than Troy. I think I may need to give Marsh a rest for a few years; they do seem to be increasingly same-y.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/9859687
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Re-read - frustratingly, I remembered whodunnit half way through, which made it less fun. It's interesting the things you pick up on as an adult that you didn't as a child - the coding of Mr Ellsworthy, for example - and how it can make you cringe...

I'll be releasing this at the BookCrossing convention in Dublin.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/9857288
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
My first foray into Heyer's crime fiction. I had previously read a couple of her Regency romances, but that's about it. This was a fairly mediocre sample of the Golden Age of dectective fiction; it felt more like an Agatha Christie TV adaptation than an Agatha Christie, if you see what I mean; everything was that bit less colourful and evocative.

This is probably not helped by the fact that I found all the characters irritating in the extreme, and am much more likely to pick up on the snobbery (of which there is plenty) these days than I was when I first picked up Hallowe'en Party. The mystery itself was mildly interesting, but I really didn't care...

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/10121519/
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
A very late Marsh, published in 1982. The usual characters (Peregrine Jay, Chief Supt Alleyn, Inspector Fox, et al, sadly no Troy) seem remarkably well-preserved. In fact, the only real indications that we are now in the eighties are, firstly, the somewhat more risqué nature of the production, and, secondly, the preoccupation with unions. Otherwise, it's Marsh business as usual, with a good old-fashioned theatre murder, a generally unpleasant villain, a token Maori character and a charismatic leading lady. Nothing special, but generally enjoyable.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/9968509
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Re-read, trying to determine whether it's set pre- or post-war (it was published 1946), for fanfic purposes. It's very difficult to tell; there's no rationing, and there definitely isn't any war going on, but... I don't know. It feels later, actually - I would have bought 1956.

As usual, identity of murderer and associated twist very clear in my memory, with the surrounding complexities less so. Much more aware of the snobberies and anti-semitism than I was the first/last time I read this.

I wonder how much Lady Angkatell owes to Sayers' Dowager Duchess? Quite a lot, I wouldn't be surprised.

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