stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
A three-in-one edition comprising Venus in Copper, The Iron Hand of Mars, and Poseidon's Gold. After this I think Davis ran out of elements. Never mind. These are possibly the only Falco books I have read in the correct order; fortunately this doesn't make too much difference, as Davis is good enough at characterisation (and not relying on the reader having read all the other books in order) for me to keep a reasonably good grasp of who was who and what was what.

I've not really much new to say about these. Venus in Copper is a potential grooms-in-the-bath case; The Iron Hand of Mars deals with Germany - the Roman Empire and beyond; Poseidon's Gold has Falco in more trouble than usual, and involves his disreputable and amusing family. (I love reading about other people's disreputable families.) All told with the usual wit and good humour, not to mention the sense that, though the past is a foreign country, they speak the same language there. I enjoyed these.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/10063696/
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Another instalment in the Falco series, which I am reading wildly out of order, but it doesn't really seem to matter much. I am reading less for the mystery and more for the local colour, which is effective and hilarious, and while I dare say it's an idealised picture of ancient Rome (or, in this case, Spain), it's an engaging one.

http://www.bookcrossing.com/journal/10125893/
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Another Falco - nothing special, but good fun, and suggesting that winter celebrations and associated provocations change little from age to age. If I'm honest, I don't read these for the mystery, but for the laugh.

Davis is easily the best proponent of dramatis personae that I've come across - hers are humorous and helpful.
stapsreads: 'The man who does not read good books has no advantage over the man who cannot read them' (Default)
Ever since I discovered that I had read every mystery novel that Agatha Christie ever wrote, I have been searching for another detective series to get hooked on. Dorothy L Sayers did the job for a while, but there's less of Wimsey than there is of Poirot. Roderick Alleyn annoys me, though I still read the odd Marsh when I find them.

But I think Marcus Didius Falco may do the job. Very readable, very funny.

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